Delirium Bibliography

The searchable delirium bibliography page is one of our most popular features, allowing you to quickly gain access to the literature on delirium and acute care of older persons.  The HELP team keeps it updated for you on a monthly basis!  Feel free to search by author, title, keywords. It is primarily intended for clinicians and researchers interested in exploring these topics.

Each article is indexed by keywords taken from MEDLINE and other relevant databases.

You may base your search on as many search terms as you like. A search term can be a keyword, an author's name, all or part of an article's title, or any word or phrase that you might expect to find in an article's abstract. You may then indicate whether you would like to limit the search to one or more options.

The results are prioritized so that entries including all search terms will be listed first, but you can indicate whether to then sort by title (the default), by author, by journal name or by publication year.

You may further restrict to a topic category. Note: If you do not enter any search terms, the results will include all of the entries for the selected topic category.

More information about each entry on this page is available by moving the mouse over the green information symbols.

Please note that Pub Med Central (PMC) full text links are provided wherever available.  However, due to copyright restrictions, only abstracts can be provided for articles not available in PMC.

Total Results: 2700

  • Dementia after delirium in patients with femoral neck fractures. 2003 Lundström M, Edlund A, Bucht G, Karlsson S, Gustafson Y. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 51:7 (1002-6)
    • Title

      Dementia after delirium in patients with femoral neck fractures.

    • Authors
      Lundström M, Edlund A, Bucht G, Karlsson S, Gustafson Y
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    • URL
    • Abstract
      To investigate whether delirium in older patients with femoral neck fractures is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia and a higher mortality rate.
    • PubMed ID
  • Delirium symptoms in post-acute care: prevalent, persistent, and associated with poor functional recovery. 2003 Marcantonio ER, Simon SE, Bergmann MA, Jones RN, Murphy KM, Morris JN. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 51:1 (4-9)
    • Title

      Delirium symptoms in post-acute care: prevalent, persistent, and associated with poor functional recovery.

    • Authors
      Marcantonio ER, Simon SE, Bergmann MA, Jones RN, Murphy KM, Morris JN
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    • URL
    • Abstract
      To determine the prevalence of delirium symptoms at the time of admission to post-acute facilities, the persistence of delirium symptoms in this setting, and the association of delirium symptoms with functional recovery.
    • PubMed ID
  • Delirium in the intensive care unit. 2003 Marshall MC, Soucy MD. Critical care nursing quarterly, 26:3 (172-8)
    • Title

      Delirium in the intensive care unit.

    • Authors
      Marshall MC, Soucy MD
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      Critical care nursing quarterly
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) is a complex, common, and problematic condition that interferes with healing and recovery. It leads to higher morbidity and mortality and extended hospital stays. The aging population older than 65, and more likely to develop delirium, is the fastest growing population in the United States and is increasingly seen in the ICU. Delirium is often unrecognized and misdiagnosed, which leads to mistreatment or lack of appropriate treatment. This article discusses the definition of delirium, pathogenesis, clinical practice guidelines, newer assessment tools for ICU, and nursing interventions directed toward prevention and early identification of delirium.
    • PubMed ID
  • Detecting acute confusion in older adults: Comparing clinical reasoning of nurses working in acute, long-term, and community health care environments. 2003 McCarthy MC. Research in nursing & health, 26:3 (203-12)
    • Title

      Detecting acute confusion in older adults: Comparing clinical reasoning of nurses working in acute, long-term, and community health care environments.

    • Authors
      McCarthy MC
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      Research in nursing & health
    • URL
    • Abstract
      In an article on a previous study involving hospitalized older adults (McCarthy, 2003), it was argued that the theory of situated clinical reasoning explains why nurses often fail to recognize acute confusion. Further, the theory illuminates how nurses' perspectives toward health in aging affect the ways they regard and ultimately deal with older people in this particular clinical situation. The purpose of the current study was to challenge and refine the theory by exploring the influence of different care environments on clinical reasoning related to acute confusion. Following a period of participant observation, a purposive sample of 30 nurses, 10 each from a teaching hospital, a long-term facility, and a home care agency, participated in semistructured interviews. Dimensional analysis provided the methodological framework for data collection and interpretation. The results reinforce prior findings that the ability of nurses to recognize acute confusion and to distinguish it from dementia can be attributed to their personal philosophies about aging. Care environment was identified as a factor that influenced clinical reasoning in limited ways under certain conditions and within certain contexts.
    • PubMed ID
  • Delirium: elders tell their stories and guide nursing practice. 2003 McCurren C, Cronin SN. Medsurg nursing : official journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, 12:5 (318-23)
    • Title

      Delirium: elders tell their stories and guide nursing practice.

    • Authors
      McCurren C, Cronin SN
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      Medsurg nursing : official journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Delirium is one of the most serious and prevalent cognitive disorders among hospitalized elders. Fourteen elders participated in this phenomenologic study describing the "lived experience" of delirium from the patient's perspective. Implications for nursing practice are derived from their reality and insight.
    • PubMed ID
  • Does delirium increase hospital stay? 2003 McCusker J, Cole MG, Dendukuri N, Belzile E. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 51:11 (1539-46)
    • Title

      Does delirium increase hospital stay?

    • Authors
      McCusker J, Cole MG, Dendukuri N, Belzile E
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    • URL
    • Abstract
      To determine the effects of prevalent and incident delirium on length of hospital stay.
    • PubMed ID
  • Delirium, depression, and anxiety. 2003 Misra S, Ganzini L. Critical care clinics, 19:4 (771-87, viii)
    • Title

      Delirium, depression, and anxiety.

    • Authors
      Misra S, Ganzini L
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      Critical care clinics
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Patients who are critically ill often develop a variety of psychiatric symptoms, which require assessment and treatment. The most common psychiatric disorder in the intensive care unit is delirium. Depressed mood and anxiety also occur, at times as discrete disorders, but more often secondary to delirium. Patients with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder, also may become critically ill--assessment and management of these patients often requires specialized psychiatric care and is not addressed here.
    • PubMed ID
  • Impaired communication capacity and agitated delirium in the final week of terminally ill cancer patients: prevalence and identification of research focus. 2003 Morita T, Tei Y, Inoue S. Journal of pain and symptom management, 26:3 (827-34)
    • Title

      Impaired communication capacity and agitated delirium in the final week of terminally ill cancer patients: prevalence and identification of research focus.

    • Authors
      Morita T, Tei Y, Inoue S
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      Journal of pain and symptom management
    • URL
    • Abstract
      The maintenance of intellectual activity is an important area in the "good death" concept. To clarify the communication capacity levels of terminally ill cancer patients in their final week, and to identify factors contributing to the development of communication capacity impairment and agitated delirium, a retrospective study was performed on 284 consecutive hospice inpatients. The data were collected by chart review, and two independent raters measured the degree of communication capacity and agitation in the last week, using multiple items from the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale, the Communication Capacity Scale, and the Agitation Distress Scale. The percentages of patients who could achieve complex communication were 43%, 28%, and 13% at 5 days, 3 days, and 1 day before death, respectively. Agitated delirium was identified in 20%. Patients receiving opioids at a dose of > or =120 mg oral morphine equivalents/day one week before death were significantly unable to communicate clearly 3 days before death (0.48 [0.28-0.84], P=0.011). Male gender and the presence of icterus were identified as significant contributors to the development of agitated delirium (odds ratios [95% C.I.]=2.6 [1.4-5.0], P<0.01; 2.4 [1.3-4.4], P< 0.01). These findings demonstrate that communication capacity impairment and agitated delirium are frequently observed in terminally ill cancer patients, and are significantly correlated with a higher dose requirement of opioids and the presence of icterus. To explore the best management to maintain the intellectual activity of dying patients, research should focus on a homogeneous sample of patients receiving high-dose opioids and those with hepatic encephalopathy. In the meanwhile, clinicians should educate patients and family members about the nature of the dying process and help facilitate the completion of life purposes requiring complex mental activities before the latest stages of cancer.
    • PubMed ID
  • Relationship between pain and opioid analgesics on the development of delirium following hip fracture. 2003 Morrison RS, Magaziner J, Gilbert M, Koval KJ, McLaughlin MA, Orosz G, Strauss E, Siu AL. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 58:1 (76-81)
    • Title

      Relationship between pain and opioid analgesics on the development of delirium following hip fracture.

    • Authors
      Morrison RS, Magaziner J, Gilbert M, Koval KJ, McLaughlin MA, Orosz G, Strauss E, Siu AL
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Delirium and pain are common following hip fracture. Untreated pain has been shown to increase the risk of delirium in older adults undergoing elective surgery. This study was performed to examine the relationship among pain, analgesics, and other factors on delirium in hip fracture patients.
    • PubMed ID
  • Identification and management of delirium in the critically ill patient with cancer. 2003 Morrison C. AACN clinical issues, 14:1 (92-111)
    • Title

      Identification and management of delirium in the critically ill patient with cancer.

    • Authors
      Morrison C
    • Year
      2003
    • Journal
      AACN clinical issues
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Rather than a specific entity, delirium is at the midpoint on a spectrum of potential mental status changes that ranges from full consciousness to deep coma. The extremes are relatively easy to recognize, but other points along the spectrum may go unrecognized or be misdiagnosed. If recognized and treated expeditiously, delirium may be reversed in some patients. It is imperative that those caring for critically ill patients with cancer have the knowledge and tools necessary to identify and manage delirium appropriately. Although all critically ill patients are at risk for delirium, cancer presents additional assaults to the central nervous system via direct tumor invasion or iatrogenic provocations. This article describes delirium in cancer, and addresses diagnostic and management issues across the course of the disease.
    • PubMed ID
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