Delirium Bibliography

**The Delirium Bibliography is moving!**

 

We're excited to announce that the Delirium Bibliography has been moved to the Network for Investigation of Delirium: Unifying Scientists (NIDUS) website! The new bibliography includes well over 3,000 references on delirium and acute care for elders in addition to new references on pediatric delirium, as well. Articles in the new bibliography are still indexed by keywords taken from MEDLINE and other relevant databases, and they can be easily browsed with a search function. Questions? Email margaretwebb@hsl.harvard.edu

The searchable delirium bibliography page is one of our most popular features, allowing you to quickly gain access to the literature on delirium and acute care of older persons.  The HELP team keeps it updated for you on a monthly basis!  Feel free to search by author, title, keywords. It is primarily intended for clinicians and researchers interested in exploring these topics.

Each article is indexed by keywords taken from MEDLINE and other relevant databases.

You may base your search on as many search terms as you like. A search term can be a keyword, an author's name, all or part of an article's title, or any word or phrase that you might expect to find in an article's abstract. You may then indicate whether you would like to limit the search to one or more options.

The results are prioritized so that entries including all search terms will be listed first, but you can indicate whether to then sort by title (the default), by author, by journal name or by publication year.

You may further restrict to a topic category. Note: If you do not enter any search terms, the results will include all of the entries for the selected topic category.

More information about each entry on this page is available by moving the mouse over the green information symbols.

Please note that Pub Med Central (PMC) full text links are provided wherever available.  However, due to copyright restrictions, only abstracts can be provided for articles not available in PMC.

Total Results: 3263

  • Confusion/delirium following cataract surgery: an incidence study of 1-year duration. 2002 Milstein A, Pollack A, Kleinman G, Barak Y. International psychogeriatrics / IPA, 14:3 (301-6)
    • Title

      Confusion/delirium following cataract surgery: an incidence study of 1-year duration.

    • Authors
      Milstein A, Pollack A, Kleinman G, Barak Y
    • Year
      2002
    • Journal
      International psychogeriatrics / IPA
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Delirium is frequently observed in clinical practice, particularly in medical and surgical wards and more so among patients at risk, especially elderly with preexisting central nervous system impairments.
    • PubMed ID
  • Acute postoperative delirium: definitions, incidence, recognition, and interventions. 2002 O'Brien D. Journal of perianesthesia nursing : official journal of the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses / American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses, 17:6 (384-92)
    • Title

      Acute postoperative delirium: definitions, incidence, recognition, and interventions.

    • Authors
      O'Brien D
    • Year
      2002
    • Journal
      Journal of perianesthesia nursing : official journal of the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses / American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Emergence excitement or delirium is a common postanesthesia complication. Often, the emergence excitement resolves quickly, and the patient's continued recovery is uneventful. Although the initial period of excitement may be short lived and resolve without long-term sequela, some patients may experience acute postoperative delirium, a phenomenon that is more difficult to assess and of potentially longer duration. Although patients are spending less time in the hospital after surgical procedures, concern over the potential development of acute postoperative delirium remains. Patients at risk present in ambulatory surgery centers and inpatient perianesthesia settings daily. Identification of at-risk patients is crucial to avoiding the development of delirium in the acute postanesthesia care setting. The purpose of this selective review is to define acute postoperative delirium and its incidence, discuss assessment and recognition, describe interventions, and identify future considerations related to this phenomenon.
    • PubMed ID
  • Delirium: an important (but often unrecognized) clinical syndrome. 2002 Rabinowitz T. Current psychiatry reports, 4:3 (202-8)
    • Title

      Delirium: an important (but often unrecognized) clinical syndrome.

    • Authors
      Rabinowitz T
    • Year
      2002
    • Journal
      Current psychiatry reports
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Delirium is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of a disturbance in consciousness accompanied by a reduced ability to focus, sustain, or shift attention. It may foreshadow impending death in as many as 25% of hospitalized inpatients and may be a source of significant morbidity in those who present with this syndrome. The disorder may go unrecognized by hospital staff as well as those close to an affected individual, and this oversight may lead to poorer outcomes including longer lengths of stay in acute care hospitals, the need for nursing home placement, prolonged cognitive disturbances, and protracted disability. This paper will address this complex condition, focusing on its history, definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, recognition, risk factors, and clinical quantification. Its prevention and treatment will be covered elsewhere in this journal.
    • PubMed ID
  • Delirium. Pragmatic guidance for managing a common, confounding, and sometimes lethal condition. 2002 Samuels SC, Evers MM. Geriatrics, 57:6 (33-8; quiz 40)
    • Title

      Delirium. Pragmatic guidance for managing a common, confounding, and sometimes lethal condition.

    • Authors
      Samuels SC, Evers MM
    • Year
      2002
    • Journal
      Geriatrics
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Virtually any medical illness, intoxication, or medication can precipitate delirium, an acute confusional state common among older persons. Delirium is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality, thus management requires thorough assessment and swift but careful action. A range of nonpharmacologic interventions can aid management of delirium, but in general, emergent, empiric pharmacotherapy is indicated for acute cases. Key to assessment and diagnosis is ruling out dementia and depression, determining the presence of delirium, and establishing an underlying cause. Several screening tools are available to aid this effort. Vigilance can help reduce the high number of patients discharged with unresolved symptoms.
    • PubMed ID
  • Assessing for delirium. 2002 Schofield I. Nursing older people, 14:7 (31-3)
  • Agitated delirium and sudden death. 2002 Vilke GM, Chan TC. Prehospital emergency care : official journal of the National Association of EMS Physicians and the National Association of State EMS Directors, 6:2 (259; author reply 259-60)
    • Title

      Agitated delirium and sudden death.

    • Authors
      Vilke GM, Chan TC
    • Year
      2002
    • Journal
      Prehospital emergency care : official journal of the National Association of EMS Physicians and the National Association of State EMS Directors
    • URL
    • Abstract
    • PubMed ID
  • Confusion assessment method (CAM). 2002 Waszynski CM. Insight (American Society of Ophthalmic Registered Nurses), 27:2 (43-4)
  • A case study of postoperative delirium. 2002 Wendel I. AORN journal, 75:3 (595-600)
  • Delirium severity and psychomotor types: their relationship with outcomes after hip fracture repair. 2002 Marcantonio E, Ta T, Duthie E, Resnick NM. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 50:5 (850-7)
    • Title

      Delirium severity and psychomotor types: their relationship with outcomes after hip fracture repair.

    • Authors
      Marcantonio E, Ta T, Duthie E, Resnick NM
    • Year
      2002
    • Journal
      Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    • URL
    • Abstract
      To validate the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) as a measure of delirium severity in a cohort of patients aged 65 and older; to examine the association between severity of delirium and patient outcomes; and to examine the association between psychomotor variants of delirium and each of those outcomes.
    • PubMed ID
  • Symptoms of delirium among elderly medical inpatients with or without dementia. 2002 Cole MG, McCusker J, Dendukuri N, Han L. The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences, 14:2 (167-75)
    • Title

      Symptoms of delirium among elderly medical inpatients with or without dementia.

    • Authors
      Cole MG, McCusker J, Dendukuri N, Han L
    • Year
      2002
    • Journal
      The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
    • URL
    • Abstract
      This study examined the frequencies of the 10 symptoms of delirium identified in DSM-III-R among patients with delirium (DSM-III-R criteria) who did or did not have dementia. The prevalence of each symptom, the numbers of symptoms, and the combinations of symptoms were determined among 322 elderly medical inpatients classified into one of four groups: delirium and dementia (n=128), delirium only (n=40), dementia only (n=94), or neither (n=60). Symptoms were assessed at the time of diagnosis and independently (by use of a different scale) within 24 hours of diagnosis. Delirium appeared to be phenomenologically similar among patients with and those without dementia, although patients with dementia had more psychomotor agitation at the time of diagnosis and more disorganized thinking and disorientation at the second assessment.
    • PubMed ID
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