Delirium Bibliography

**The Delirium Bibliography is moving!**

 

We're excited to announce that the Delirium Bibliography has been moved to the Network for Investigation of Delirium: Unifying Scientists (NIDUS) website! The new bibliography includes well over 3,000 references on delirium and acute care for elders in addition to new references on pediatric delirium, as well. Articles in the new bibliography are still indexed by keywords taken from MEDLINE and other relevant databases, and they can be easily browsed with a search function. Questions? Email margaretwebb@hsl.harvard.edu

The searchable delirium bibliography page is one of our most popular features, allowing you to quickly gain access to the literature on delirium and acute care of older persons.  The HELP team keeps it updated for you on a monthly basis!  Feel free to search by author, title, keywords. It is primarily intended for clinicians and researchers interested in exploring these topics.

Each article is indexed by keywords taken from MEDLINE and other relevant databases.

You may base your search on as many search terms as you like. A search term can be a keyword, an author's name, all or part of an article's title, or any word or phrase that you might expect to find in an article's abstract. You may then indicate whether you would like to limit the search to one or more options.

The results are prioritized so that entries including all search terms will be listed first, but you can indicate whether to then sort by title (the default), by author, by journal name or by publication year.

You may further restrict to a topic category. Note: If you do not enter any search terms, the results will include all of the entries for the selected topic category.

More information about each entry on this page is available by moving the mouse over the green information symbols.

Please note that Pub Med Central (PMC) full text links are provided wherever available.  However, due to copyright restrictions, only abstracts can be provided for articles not available in PMC.

Total Results: 3263

  • Acute confusional states in patients undergoing hip surgery. a prospective observation study. 2000 Duppils GS, Wikblad K. Gerontology, 46:1 (36-43)
    • Title

      Acute confusional states in patients undergoing hip surgery. a prospective observation study.

    • Authors
      Duppils GS, Wikblad K
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      Gerontology
    • URL
    • Abstract
      There is general agreement that acute confusional state (ACS) is common among elderly patients admitted to hospital, although exact figures are difficult to obtain. The objective of the current study was to investigate the onset of ACS during hospital stay and to isolate possible predisposing, facilitating and precipitating factors associated with the onset of ACS.
    • PubMed ID
  • Delirium is independently associated with poor functional recovery after hip fracture. 2000 Marcantonio ER, Flacker JM, Michaels M, Resnick NM. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 48:6 (618-24)
    • Title

      Delirium is independently associated with poor functional recovery after hip fracture.

    • Authors
      Marcantonio ER, Flacker JM, Michaels M, Resnick NM
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    • URL
    • Abstract
      To evaluate the role of delirium in the natural history of functional recovery after hip fracture surgery, independent of prefracture status.
    • PubMed ID
  • Development of delirium: a prospective cohort study in a community hospital. 2000 Martin NJ, Stones MJ, Young JE, Bédard M. International psychogeriatrics / IPA, 12:1 (117-27)
    • Title

      Development of delirium: a prospective cohort study in a community hospital.

    • Authors
      Martin NJ, Stones MJ, Young JE, Bédard M
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      International psychogeriatrics / IPA
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Previous research on risk of delirium in acute hospital settings identified mainly patient variables (e.g., age) that are not amenable to intervention. The purpose of this study was to develop a model for new delirium in hospitalized older patients that included process of care and social variables.
    • PubMed ID
  • Do hospital fall prevention programs work? A systematic review. 2000 Oliver D, Hopper A, Seed P. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 48:12 (1679-89)
    • Title

      Do hospital fall prevention programs work? A systematic review.

    • Authors
      Oliver D, Hopper A, Seed P
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    • URL
    • Abstract
      To analyze published hospital fall prevention programs to determine whether there is any effect on fall rates. To review the methodological quality of those programs and the range of interventions used. To provide directions for further research.
    • PubMed ID
  • An epidemiological study of falls on integrated general medical wards. 2000 Vassallo M, Azeem T, Pirwani MF, Sharma JC, Allen SC. International journal of clinical practice, 54:10 (654-7)
    • Title

      An epidemiological study of falls on integrated general medical wards.

    • Authors
      Vassallo M, Azeem T, Pirwani MF, Sharma JC, Allen SC
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      International journal of clinical practice
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Reducing falls in hospital requires an environmental as well as a patient-orientated approach. We studied patient and ward characteristics relating to falls in an acute setting. In a prospective open observational study, we examined fall characteristics in two nuclear designed wards (A and B) and a longitudinal ward (C). We recorded 63 falls among 1609 patients. Ward C had the most falls (31 vs 18/14; p = 0.01), fall positive days (29 vs 15/10; p = 0.002) and fallers (27 vs 13/12; p = 0.001; OR 2.54, CI--1.41-4.57). Ward C had a higher cumulative risk of falls (p = 0.006) and fall positive days (p = 0.003). Choice of ward was a significant independent risk factor for falls (p = 0.01) when controlled for age, sex, and diagnostic variation between the wards. Most falls were intrinsic (A 66.7%, B 64.2%, C 61.3%, p = 0.45). A significantly higher proportion of falls on ward C occurred by the bed (p = 0.04). Significant differences exist between the wards, and fall reduction programmes should identify and compensate for adverse ward-related factors to increase the effectiveness of patient-targeted fall risk assessments.
    • PubMed ID
  • Falls on integrated medical wards. 2000 Vassallo M, Amersey RA, Sharma JC, Allen SC. Gerontology, 46:3 (158-62)
    • Title

      Falls on integrated medical wards.

    • Authors
      Vassallo M, Amersey RA, Sharma JC, Allen SC
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      Gerontology
    • URL
    • Abstract
      An effective approach to fall prevention should involve an assessment of environmental as well as patient-related characteristics.
    • PubMed ID
  • Survival in end-stage dementia following acute illness. 2000 Morrison RS, Siu AL. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 284:1 (47-52)
    • Title

      Survival in end-stage dementia following acute illness.

    • Authors
      Morrison RS, Siu AL
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Little is known about the prognosis of acutely ill patients with end-stage dementia or about the type of care that these patients receive. If their prognosis is poor, then emphasis should be placed on palliative care for these patients rather than on curative interventions.
    • PubMed ID
  • Delirium in terminal cancer: a prospective study using daily screening, early diagnosis, and continuous monitoring. 2000 Gagnon P, Allard P, Mâsse B, DeSerres M. Journal of pain and symptom management, 19:6 (412-26)
    • Title

      Delirium in terminal cancer: a prospective study using daily screening, early diagnosis, and continuous monitoring.

    • Authors
      Gagnon P, Allard P, Mâsse B, DeSerres M
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      Journal of pain and symptom management
    • URL
    • Abstract
      A pilot prospective cohort study was conducted to determine delirium frequency and outcome in cancer patients consecutively hospitalized for terminal care (median stay: 12 days). Screening for delirium symptoms was performed daily, using the Confusion Rating Scale. Patients positive on screening had a diagnostic assessment within 24 hours using the Confusion Assessment Method. Monitoring of symptoms was continued until death. Eighteen (20%) of the 89 study patients were positive on screening at admission. Among the 71 patients free of delirium at admission, the incidence of confirmed delirium was 32. 8% (95% CI, 21.3-44.3%). Patients positive on screening received a higher mean equivalent parenteral daily dose of morphine than other patients (72 mg vs. 41 mg, p = 0.08). Significant symptom improvement occurred in 16 (50%) of the 32 delirious cases. Delirium is a serious and frequent complication in terminal cancer whose outcome may not be as poor as previously considered.
    • PubMed ID
  • Impact of delirium on the short term prognosis of advanced cancer patients. Italian Multicenter Study Group on Palliative Care. 2000 Caraceni A, Nanni O, Maltoni M, Piva L, Indelli M, Arnoldi E, Monti M, Montanari L, Amadori D, De Conno F. Cancer, 89:5 (1145-9)
    • Title

      Impact of delirium on the short term prognosis of advanced cancer patients. Italian Multicenter Study Group on Palliative Care.

    • Authors
      Caraceni A, Nanni O, Maltoni M, Piva L, Indelli M, Arnoldi E, Monti M, Montanari L, Amadori D, De Conno F
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      Cancer
    • URL
    • Abstract
      The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of delirium on the survival of advanced cancer patients also assessed with a validated prognostic score (the palliative prognostic [PaP] score).
    • PubMed ID
  • Outcomes associated with delirium in acutely hospitalized acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients. 2000 Uldall KK, Harris VL, Lalonde B. Comprehensive psychiatry, 41:2 (88-91)
    • Title

      Outcomes associated with delirium in acutely hospitalized acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients.

    • Authors
      Uldall KK, Harris VL, Lalonde B
    • Year
      2000
    • Journal
      Comprehensive psychiatry
    • URL
    • Abstract
      The study demonstrates that delirium in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients is associated with mortality, the need for long-term care, and an increased length of hospitalization. Data were collected prospectively on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients admitted to a teaching hospital from January 1996 through December 1996. The data included demographic characteristics of the participants, medical diagnoses, CD4 cell count, Karnofsky functional assessment, mortality during admission, length of stay, and discharge placement. Participants were evaluated throughout their hospital stay for evidence of delirium. The presence of delirium was determined using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. There were no significant differences between delirious and nondelirious patients with respect to demographic characteristics or markers of medical morbidity. Patients with delirium were more likely to die during admission (chi-square [chi2] = 39.1, df = 1, P<.0010), to stay longer in hospital (t = 3.50, df = 12.9, P<.0041), or to need long-term care if discharged alive (chi2 = 12.8, df = 2, P<.0021). Delirium is associated with adverse outcomes in hospitalized AIDS patients. More research is needed to characterize the nature of this association.
    • PubMed ID
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