Delirium Bibliography

**The Delirium Bibliography is moving!**

 

We're excited to announce that the Delirium Bibliography has been moved to the Network for Investigation of Delirium: Unifying Scientists (NIDUS) website! The new bibliography includes well over 3,000 references on delirium and acute care for elders in addition to new references on pediatric delirium, as well. Articles in the new bibliography are still indexed by keywords taken from MEDLINE and other relevant databases, and they can be easily browsed with a search function. Questions? Email margaretwebb@hsl.harvard.edu

The searchable delirium bibliography page is one of our most popular features, allowing you to quickly gain access to the literature on delirium and acute care of older persons.  The HELP team keeps it updated for you on a monthly basis!  Feel free to search by author, title, keywords. It is primarily intended for clinicians and researchers interested in exploring these topics.

Each article is indexed by keywords taken from MEDLINE and other relevant databases.

You may base your search on as many search terms as you like. A search term can be a keyword, an author's name, all or part of an article's title, or any word or phrase that you might expect to find in an article's abstract. You may then indicate whether you would like to limit the search to one or more options.

The results are prioritized so that entries including all search terms will be listed first, but you can indicate whether to then sort by title (the default), by author, by journal name or by publication year.

You may further restrict to a topic category. Note: If you do not enter any search terms, the results will include all of the entries for the selected topic category.

More information about each entry on this page is available by moving the mouse over the green information symbols.

Please note that Pub Med Central (PMC) full text links are provided wherever available.  However, due to copyright restrictions, only abstracts can be provided for articles not available in PMC.

Total Results: 3263

  • Acute confusional states in hospitalized elderly: a research dilemma. 1986 Foreman MD. Nursing research, 35:1 (34-8)
    • Title

      Acute confusional states in hospitalized elderly: a research dilemma.

    • Authors
      Foreman MD
    • Year
      1986
    • Journal
      Nursing research
    • URL
    • Abstract
      This article reviews the literature on acute confusional states, including classification, incidence and prevalence, etiology, psychogenetic theories, and implications for nursing.
    • PubMed ID
  • After the fall--confusion. 1986 Campbell EB, Williams MA, Mlynarczyk SM. The American journal of nursing, 86:2 (151-4)
  • Bedside cognitive screening instruments. A critical assessment. 1986 Nelson A, Fogel BS, Faust D. The Journal of nervous and mental disease, 174:2 (73-83)
    • Title

      Bedside cognitive screening instruments. A critical assessment.

    • Authors
      Nelson A, Fogel BS, Faust D
    • Year
      1986
    • Journal
      The Journal of nervous and mental disease
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Bedside cognitive screening instruments are used increasingly in clinical and research settings to detect cognitive impairment and to quantify its severity. The authors review the five most frequently cited bedside screening tests that use an interview format and require brief administration times: the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Cognitive Capacity Screening Examination, Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, Kahn's Mental Status Questionnaire, and the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire. The tests all have adequate inter-rater reliability, and adequate test-retest reliability has been established for three of the tests. All of the tests show close correspondence with clinical diagnoses of delirium and dementia and are useful for the diagnosis and quantification of these syndromes. However, there is currently no evidence that the tests increase the level of diagnostic accuracy achieved through clinical examination alone. All of the tests have substantial false-negative rates, with false-negative errors frequent among patients with focal lesions, particularly of the right hemisphere. False-positive errors may be more common among patients with less education and lower socioeconomic status. The tests reviewed do not detect many types of cognitive deficit that may bear critically on differential diagnosis and case management. Suggestions are given for further research on the current measures and for the development of new screening tests that would meet a broader range of clinical purposes.
    • PubMed ID
  • Acute confusional states (delirium) in the hospitalized elderly. 1986 Levkoff SE, Besdine RW, Wetle T. Annual review of gerontology & geriatrics, (1-26)
    • Title

      Acute confusional states (delirium) in the hospitalized elderly.

    • Authors
      Levkoff SE, Besdine RW, Wetle T
    • Year
      1986
    • Journal
      Annual review of gerontology & geriatrics
    • URL
    • Abstract
    • PubMed ID
  • Confusion after admission to hospital in elderly patients using benzodiazepines. 1986 Foy A, Drinkwater V, March S, Mearrick P. British medical journal (Clinical research ed.), 293:6554 (1072)
    • Title

      Confusion after admission to hospital in elderly patients using benzodiazepines.

    • Authors
      Foy A, Drinkwater V, March S, Mearrick P
    • Year
      1986
    • Journal
      British medical journal (Clinical research ed.)
    • URL
    • Abstract
    • PubMed ID
  • Effect of fasting on hypoxia tolerance of mice in relation to oxygen consumption and heart rate. 1985 Watanabe C, Suzuki T. Aviation, space, and environmental medicine, 56:12 (1198-202)
    • Title

      Effect of fasting on hypoxia tolerance of mice in relation to oxygen consumption and heart rate.

    • Authors
      Watanabe C, Suzuki T
    • Year
      1985
    • Journal
      Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Mice more than 8 weeks old were fasted for 1 or 2 d and challenged by severe acute hypoxia. The hypoxia survival times (ST) were compared to the body weight, oxygen consumption (VO2), or heart rate (HR) of each animal. The duration of fasting was found to be important to determine ST. VO2 or HR were negatively correlated with ST, whether mice were fasted or not. The regression line (InST on HR) in the fed (control) group did not significantly differ from that of 2-d fasted groups, but those of fed and 1-d fasted groups differed. These results suggested that, in fasting for 2 d, the reduction in energy consumption was a major determining factor of hypoxia survival; in 1-d fasting, other factors might operate to determine the tolerance.
    • PubMed ID
  • [Immunohistochemical studies in thyroid follicular lesions. Thyroglobulin and thyroxine demonstration]. 1985 Simian S, Avagnina A, Elsner B. Medicina, 45:4 (461-6)
    • Title

      [Immunohistochemical studies in thyroid follicular lesions. Thyroglobulin and thyroxine demonstration].

    • Authors
      Simian S, Avagnina A, Elsner B
    • Year
      1985
    • Journal
      Medicina
    • URL
    • Abstract
    • PubMed ID
  • Acute confusional states in the elderly: an algorithm. 1984 Foreman MD. Dimensions of critical care nursing : DCCN, 3:4 (207-15)
  • Transient cognitive disorders (delirium, acute confusional states) in the elderly. 1983 Lipowski ZJ. The American journal of psychiatry, 140:11 (1426-36)
    • Title

      Transient cognitive disorders (delirium, acute confusional states) in the elderly.

    • Authors
      Lipowski ZJ
    • Year
      1983
    • Journal
      The American journal of psychiatry
    • URL
    • Abstract
      Transient cognitive disorders (delirium and pseudodelirium) are highly prevalent among the elderly, especially those with brain damage. Delirium is a common feature of physical illness or drug intoxication in elderly patients and requires prompt medical attention. While potentially reversible, delirium may herald death. Pseudodelirium may be induced by psychosocial stress or accompany a functional mental disorder. Transient cognitive disorders must not be confused with dementia, a chronic syndrome. The author discusses clinical features, etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium and related transient disorders of cognition in the elderly.
    • PubMed ID
  • Adverse consequences of hospitalization in the elderly. 1982 Gillick MR, Serrell NA, Gillick LS. Social science & medicine (1982), 16:10 (1033-8)
    • Title

      Adverse consequences of hospitalization in the elderly.

    • Authors
      Gillick MR, Serrell NA, Gillick LS
    • Year
      1982
    • Journal
      Social science & medicine (1982)
    • URL
    • Abstract
      This study prospectively examines 502 general medical patients for evidence of side-effect of hospitalization unrelated to diagnosis or therapy of acute illness. Symptoms of depressed psychophysiologic functioning (confusion, falling, not eating, and incontinence) unrelated to acute medical diagnoses were found in 8.8% of the patients under 70 and in 40.5% of the elderly population (P less than 0.0001). The rate of medical intervention secondary to these symptoms (psychotropic medications, restraints, nasogastric tubes, and foley catheters) was 37.9% among the young patients and 47.1% in the elderly group (P = 0.4). The sample was too small to permit adequate empirical determination of the complication rate from medical intervention (thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolus, aspiration pneumonia, urinary tract infection, septic shock) but estimates from the literature indicate that each of the interventions studied entails a complication rate of 25-30%. Combining the observed rate of functional symptoms development and intervention, and the literature rates of complications, yields a risk of complications of 1.0% for the young and 5.7% for the elderly (P less than 0.0001). These data indicate that hospitalized elderly patients are at high risk of developing symptoms of depressed psychophysiology functioning and of sustaining medical intervention as a result of these symptoms, with attendant medical complications. We suggest that in incidence of depressed psychophysiologic function needs to be assessed in patients treated outside the hospital, along with efficacy of treatment outside the hospital, to determine whether there are patients for whom hospitalization is not optimal therapy.
    • PubMed ID
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